Posts tagged ‘Sidoxia Capital Management’

January a Ball After Year-End Fall

disco ball

Investors were cheerfully dancing last month after the stock market posted its best January in 30 years and the best monthly performance since October 2015 (see chart below). More specifically, the S&P 500 index started the year by catapulting +7.9% higher (the best January since 1987), and the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 1,672 points to 25,000, or +7.2%. But over the last few months there has been plenty of heartburn and volatility. The December so-called Santa Claus rally did not occur until a large pre-Christmas pullback. From the September record high, stocks temporarily fell about -20% before the recent jolly +15% post-Christmas rebound.

month perf

Source: FactSet via The Wall Street Journal

Although investors have been gleefully boogying on the short-run financial dance floor, there have been plenty of issues causing uncomfortable blisters. At the top of the list is China-U.S. trade. The world is eagerly watching the two largest global economic powerhouses as they continue to delicately dance through trade negotiations. Even though neither country has slipped or fallen since the 90-day trade truce, which began on December 1 in Buenos Aires, the stakes remain high. If an agreement is not reached by March 2, tariffs on imported Chinese goods would increase to 25% from 10% on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods, thereby raising prices for U.S. consumers and potentially leading to further retaliatory responses from Beijing.

When it comes to the subjects of intellectual property protection and forced technology transfers of American companies doing business in China, President Xi Jinping has been uncomfortably stepping on President Donald Trump’s toes. Nothing has been formally finalized, however Chinese officials have signaled they are willing to make some structural reforms relating to these thorny issues and have also expressed a willingness to narrow the trade deficit with our country by purchasing more of our exports. Besides procuring more American energy goods, the Chinese have also committed to buy 5,000,000 tons of our country’s soybeans to feed China’s hungry population of 1.4 billion people.

Reaching a trade settlement is important for both countries, especially in light of the slowing Chinese economy (see chart below) and the dissipating stimulus benefits of the 2018 U.S. tax cuts. Slowing growth in China has implications beyond our borders as witnessed by slowing growth in Europe  as evidenced by protests we have seen in France and the contraction of German manufacturing (the first time in over four years). Failed Brexit talks of the U.K. potentially leaving the European Union could add fuel to the global slowdown fire if an agreement cannot be reached by the March 29th deadline in a couple months.

ret sal

Source: Wind via The Wall Street Journal

While the temporary halt to the longest partial federal government shutdown in history (35 days) has brought some short-term relief to the 800,000 government workers/contractors who did not receive pay, the political standoff over border security may last longer than expected, which may further dampen U.S. economic activity and growth. Whether the hot-button issue of border wall funding is resolved by February 15th will determine if another shutdown is in the cards.

Despite China trade negotiations and the government shutdown deadlock placing a cloud over financial markets, brighter skies have begun to emerge in other areas. First and foremost has been the positive shift in positioning by the Federal Reserve as it relates to monetary policy. Not only has Jay Powell (Fed Chairman) communicated a clear signal of being “patient” on future interest rate target increases, but he has also taken the Fed off of “autopilot” as it relates to shrinking the Fed’s balance sheet – a process that can hinder economic growth. Combined, these shifts in strategy by the Fed have been enthusiastically received by investors, which has been a large contributor to the +15% rebound in stock prices since the December lows. Thanks to this change in stance, the inverted yield curve bogeyman that typically precedes post-World War II recessions has been held at bay as evidenced by the steepening yield curve (see chart below).

treasury spread

Source: Calafia Beach Pundit

Other areas of strength include the recent employment data, which showed 304,000 jobs added in January, the 100th consecutive month of increased employment. Fears of an imminent recession that penetrated psyches in the fourth quarter have abated significantly in January in part because of the notable strength seen in 4th quarter corporate profits, which so far have increased by +12% from last year, according to FactSet. The strength and rebound in overall commodity prices, including oil, seem to indicate any potential looming recession is likely further out in time than emotionally feared.

wall of worry

Source: Calafia Beach Pundit

As the chart above shows, over the last four years, spikes in fear (red line) have represented beneficial buying opportunities of stocks (blue line). The pace of gains in January is just as unsustainable as the pace of fourth-quarter losses were in stock prices. Uncertainties may remain on trade, shutdowns, geopolitics, and other issues but don’t throw away your investing dance shoes quite yet…the ball and music experienced last month could continue for a longer than expected period of time.

investment-questions-border

www.Sidoxia.com

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®

Plan. Invest. Prosper.

This article is an excerpt from a previously released Sidoxia Capital Management complimentary newsletter (February 1, 2018). Subscribe on the right side of the page for the complete text.

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients hold positions and certain exchange traded funds (ETFs), but at the time of publishing had no direct position in any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC Contact page.

February 1, 2019 at 5:00 pm Leave a comment

Celebrating Another Year, Another Decade for Sidoxia

This article is an excerpt from a previously released Sidoxia Capital Management complimentary newsletter (January 2, 2018). Subscribe on the right side of the page for the complete text.

Not only is New Year’s the time to celebrate the year that has just passed, but it is also the time to set new resolutions for the year to come. For financial markets, especially the stock market, 2017 was a special year of celebration. In addition to the S&P 500 index rejoicing a +19% gain, the more narrowly focused Dow Jones Industrial Average (consisting solely of 30 stocks) partied to an even more impressive +25% advance. Out of the three major stock indexes, the icing on the cake can be savored by the technology-heavy NASDAQ index, which soared +28% in 2017.

Can the mojo of this festive bull market continue into its 10th year after the financial crisis? The short answer is “yes”, but there are numerous variables that can cause the performance gusts to swirl into a headwind or a tailwind. While many Americans are glued to the topic of politics and get caught up in the continual mudslinging, followers of Sidoxia Capital Management’s writings (see also Politics & Your Money) understand there are much more important factors impacting the long-term performance of your investments. More specifically, the following four factors I track on Sidoxia’s financial dashboard (Don’t Be a Fool)  have continued to act as significant tailwinds for positive stock performance:

  • Corporate profits
  • Interest rates
  • Valuations
  • Sentiment

Sidoxia’s 10-Year Anniversary

The year 2018 also happens to be a special year that marks a significant milestone in my professional career. A decade ago in late 2007, I ventured off from managing one of the largest multi-billion growth funds in the country (see How I Managed $20,000,000,000.00 by Age 32) and launched my own company, Sidoxia Capital Management in Newport Beach, California. At the time of the launch (December 2007), and subsequent to the bursting of the 2000 technology bubble, stock prices had about doubled over a five year period, starting in early 2003 (see chart).

On top of having the leading investment credentials (CFA, MBA, and CFP) and the experience of successfully managing a multi-billion fund, I also held the youthful confidence and optimism of a 30-something year-old (Trivia fact: the name Sidoxia is derived from the Greek word for “optimism”). What could possibly go wrong? How about the worst financial collapse in a generation (79 years)!

Suffice it to say, the global panic and recession that resulted in stock prices crumbling -50% (see chart below) temporarily bruised my youthful confidence and briefly punched my optimistic enthusiasm in the gut. In hindsight, what felt like a disaster at that point turned out to be a perfect time to start Sidoxia. The advantage of starting with virtually no clients meant that most of my early clients have enjoyed participating in a near quadrupling in stock prices to the near-record highs of today.

However, it wasn’t all rainbows and unicorns over Sidoxia’s first ten years (2007 – 2017). Despite the Dow advancing to 24,719 today from the 2009-low of 6,470, there were at least 11 substantial corrections (price drops) ranging from -5% to -22%. The extraordinary climb up the financial mountain included a “Flash Crash”, U.S. debt downgrade, eurozone economic crisis, Ebola scare, Brexit vote, multiple presidential elections, and China recession scares, among numerous other fear-grabbing headlines.

What Now?

As I have described on numerous occasions (see also Fool’s Errand), predicting short-term directions in the stock market is a fruitless effort. With that said, our correctly positioned positive stance over the years can be clearly documented on my blog (see InvestingCaffeine.com).

For example, 2017 was one of Sidoxia’s best years thanks in large part to our positive outlook (see Wiping Slate Clean), even though headlines were dominated by mass shootings, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, White House politics, Bitcoin/cryptocurrencies, and let’s not forget the sexual harassment revelations. But in going back to my previous comments, the key follow-up question becomes, “Do these headlines negatively impact the four key pillars of corporate profits, interest rates, valuations, and sentiment?” And the short answer is “No”.

On the positive side of the ledger, we have a newly minted tax legislation that dramatically loweres corporate tax rates from 35% to 21%. This move should significantly stimulate corporate profits, thereby creating extra cash for shareholder friendly actions like increased dividends and stock buybacks, not to mention more cash in corporate coffers for further acquisitions. Worth also noting, the global synchronized economic recovery continues to buoy the stellar U.S. performance. Evidence of the rising international tide lifting all global boats can be seen in the 2017 performance of various international equity markets*:

  • Vietnam: +48%
  • Hong Kong: +36%
  • Asia (Overall): +30%
  • India: +27%
  • Brazil: +26%
  • Europe (VGK): +23%
  • Japan: +17%

Source: CNBC 12/29 & Sidoxia

What could negatively impact investment results in 2018? For starters, overly aggressive (“hawkish”) monetary policy by the Federal Reserve could potentially slam the brakes on the economy. In my view this scenario is unlikely given the rhetoric and new composition of the Federal Open Market Committee, including new chief Jerome Powell. Regardless of the historically low Federal Funds rate, interest rate policy is definitely worth following in the coming months.

Another wildcard that could slow down the 10-year bull market is a spike in the value of the U.S. dollar. As we saw in 2015-2016, a higher valued dollar makes American goods more expensive abroad, which will crimp corporate profits. Beyond these known unknowns, there are always what Donald Rumsfeld likes to call unknown unknowns“. These unknowns can include things like terrorist attacks, currency crises, foreign bank defaults, natural disasters, etc. Short-term volatility typically ensues after these uncontrollable events, but history has proven our country’s resilience.

With the new tax legislation voted into law and shift of IRS calendar, a cohort of investors may now choose to temporarily sell stocks during January, which could briefly lower stock prices. I fully understand stock prices cannot go up forever, but as long as the previously discussed four key pillars remain positive on balance, the New Year’s celebration can continue.

www.Sidoxia.com

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®

Plan. Invest. Prosper.

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients hold positions in certain exchange traded funds (ETFs), but at the time of publishing had no direct position in any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC Contact page.

January 2, 2018 at 1:12 pm 2 comments

The Art & Science of Successful Investing

As I described in my book, How I Managed $20,000,000,000.00 by Age 32, I believe successful investing is achieved by integrating aspects of both art and science. The science aspect of investing is fairly straightforward – most of the accounting and valuation math involved could be solved by a 7th grader. The more challenging aspect to successful investing is controlling the vacillating emotions of fear and greed when searching for attractive investments.

When people ask me about my investment philosophy, I do not like to be pigeon-holed into one style box because normally my portfolios hold investments that outsiders would deem both value and growth oriented. Since I am an absolute return investor, I am more concerned about how I can maximize upside returns while minimizing downside risk for my investors.

Because valuation is such an important factor in my process (price always matters), the most accurate description of my style would likely be “high octane GARP” (Growth At a Reasonable Price). While many GARP investors limit themselves to current or historical valuation metrics, my process has allowed me to take a more long-term, forward looking analysis of valuations, which has directed me to participate in some large winners, like Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), and Google/Alphabet (GOOGL), to name a few. To many observers, positions like these have traditionally been falsely considered “expensive” growth stocks.

Case in point is Google/Alphabet, which went public at $85 per share in 2004. At the time, the broad Wall Street consensus was the IPO (Initial Public Offering) price was way overheated. As it turned out, the stock has reached $1,000 per share and the Price-Earnings ratio (P/E) was a steal at less than 3x had you bought Google at the IPO price. ($85 2004 price/$33.98 2017 EPS estimate). Google is a perfect example of a dominant market leader that has been able to grow earnings dramatically for many years. In short order after going public, Google’s earnings ended up more than quintupling in less than three years and the stock price quintupled as well, proving that ill-advised focus on stale, traditional valuation metrics can lead you to wrong conclusions. Certainly, finding stocks that can increase in value by more than 11x fold is easier said than done, however, applying longer-term valuation metrics to dominant growth leading franchises will allow you to occasionally find monster winners like Google.

The greatest long-term winners don’t start off as the largest weightings, but due to the compounding of returns, position sizes can explode over time. As Peter Lynch states,

“You don’t need a lot of good hits every day. All you need is two to three good stocks a decade.”

 

Google/Alphabet proves what can appear expensive in the short-run is, in many cases, wildly cheap based on future earnings growth. Earnings tomorrow may be significantly larger than earnings today. Lynch emphasizes the importance of earnings over current prices,

“People concentrate too much on the ‘P’ (Price), but the ‘E’ (Earnings) really makes the difference.”
 “Just because a stock is cheaper than before is no reason to buy it, and just because it’s more expensive is no reason to sell.”

 

The Google/Alphabet chart below shows the incredible price appreciation that can be realized from compounding earnings growth.

The Google example also underscores the importance of patience. Although the stock has been a massive home-run since its IPO, the stock barely budged from late 2006 through 2011. Accurately picking the perfect timing to make an investment is nearly impossible. I concur with Bill Miller when he stated,

“We expect the stocks we buy today to contribute to our performance several years hence. While it’s nice if they contribute to this year’s performance, this year’s performance should be driven by decisions we made in previous years. If we keep doing this, we hope that we will provide adequate returns in the future.”

 

Regarding timing, Miller adds,

“Nobody buys at lows and sells at highs except liars.”

 

The Sidoxia Philosophy

Over time, as I have fine-tuned my investment philosophy, I have not been bashful in borrowing winning ideas from growth gurus like Peter Lynch, Phil Fisher, William O’Neil,  and Ron Baron, to name a few. By the same token, I am not shy about stealing ideas from value veterans like Warren Buffett, Seth Klarman, and Bill Miller as well.

While I don’t agree with Warren Buffett’s “forever” time horizon, I do believe in the power of compounding he espouses, which requires a longer-term investment horizon. The power of compounding is accelerated not only by committing to a long-term horizon, but also by the benefits accrued from lower trading costs and taxes. What’s more, taking a long view lowers your blood pressure and creates fewer ulcers. Legendary growth manager, T. Rowe Price, captures the essence of this idea here:

“The growth stock theory of investing requires patience, but is less stressful than trading, generally has less risk, and reduces brokerage commissions and income taxes.”

 

The Science of Investing

As discussed earlier, successful investing is an endeavor that involves the practices of both art and science – too much of either approach can be detrimental to your financial health. Quantitative screening can be an excellent tool for identifying new securities for research along with streamlining the fundamental analysis process. However, many investment funds rely too heavily on the quantitative science. The adage that “correlation does not equal causation” is an important credo to follow when reviewing various quantitative models (see Butter in Bangladesh).

The collapse of the infamous, multi-billion Long Term Capital Management hedge fund should also be a lesson to everyone (see When Genius Failed ). If world renowned Nobel Prize winners, Robert Merton and Myron Scholes, can single-handedly bring the global market to its knees as a result of using inconsistent and unreliable quantitative models, then I feel validated for my fundamentally-based investment approach.

While there are some artistic facets to valuation techniques, in large part, the valuation science is a fairly straightforward mathematical exercise. Unfortunately, the market consists of emotional and unpredictable individuals who continually change their opinions. Eventually the financial markets prod prices in the right direction, but over shorter time intervals, proper investment analysis requires some imperfect estimation.

Emotions regularly result in individuals overpaying for stocks, and this tendency is a risky strategy for any investment. In many cases investors chase darling stocks highlighted in news headlines, but regrettably these pricy investments often end up performing poorly. When it comes to hot stocks, I’m on the same page as famed value investor Bill Miller,

“If it’s in the papers, it’s in the price. One needs to anticipate, not react.”

 

Usually a news event that makes headlines is already factored into the stock price. The financial markets are generally forward looking mechanisms, not backward looking.

The Art of Investing

“It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.”

-Yogi Berra

Investing is undoubtedly a challenging undertaking, but like almost any profession, the more experience one has, the better results generally achieved. Experience alone does not guarantee extraordinary performance, in large part due to emotional pressures. Investing would be much easier for everyone, if you didn’t have to worry about controlling those pesky emotions of fear and greed. The best investment decisions, and frankly any decision, are rarely made under these heightened emotions.

The most successful set of investors I have studied and modeled my investment process after are professionals who have married the quantitative science with the fundamental art of investing. At Sidoxia, we use a disciplined cash flow based valuation approach, along with thorough fundamental analysis to identify attractively valued, market leading franchises that can sustain above average growth. It sounds like a mouthful, but over time, it has worked well for the benefit of my clients and me.

The market leading franchises we invest in tend to have a competitive advantage, whether in the form of superior research and development, low-cost manufacturing, leading marketing, and/or other exceptional functions in the company that allow the entity to consistently garner more growth and more market share from its competitors. Quality franchises tend to also employ first-class management teams that have a proven track record, along with thoughtful, systematic processes in place to maintain their competitive edge. These competitive advantages are what allow companies to produce exceptional earnings growth for extended periods of time, thereby producing outstanding long-term performance for shareholders.

Finding sustainable growth in competitive niche markets is nearly impossible, and that is why I center my attention on large or emerging sectors of the economy that can support long runways of growth. When analyzing companies with durable, long runways of earnings growth, I concentrate on those developing, share-taking companies and dominant market leaders. In other words, disruptive companies that are entering new markets with vast potential and established companies that are gaining significant share in large markets. Well-known growth authority, Phil Fisher summarized the objective,

“The greatest investment rewards come to those who by good luck or good sense find the occasional company that over the years can grow in sales and profits far more than industry as a whole.”

 

I am privileged and honored to manage the hard earned investments of my clients. If this was a simple profession, everyone would do it, and I would not be employed as an investment manager. I have developed what I believe is a superior way of managing money, but I realize my investment process is not the only way to make money. If you were to assemble 10 different investment managers in the same room, and ask them, “What is the best way to invest money?,” you are likely to get 10 different answers. Having been in the investment industry and managed money for over 25 years, my experience has shown me that the vast majority of professional managers have underperformed the passive benchmarks. However, there are investment managers who have survived the test of time. For those veterans incorporating a disciplined, systematic approach that integrates the artistic and scientific aspects of investing, exceptional long-term returns can be achieved and have been achieved.

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®

Plan. Invest. Prosper.

www.Sidoxia.com

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients own certain exchange traded funds, AMZN, GOOG/GOOGL, and AAPL, but at the time of publishing SCM had no direct position in any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC “Contact” page.

June 18, 2017 at 7:25 pm Leave a comment

More Treats, Less Tricks

pumpkin ornament

This article is an excerpt from a previously released Sidoxia Capital Management complimentary newsletter (November 2, 2015). Subscribe on the right side of the page for the complete text.

Have you finished licking the last of your Halloween chocolate-covered fingers and scheduled your next cavity-filled dental appointment? After a few challenging months, the normally spooky month of October produced an abundance of sweet treats rather than scary tricks for stock market investors. In fact, the S&P 500 index finished the month with a whopping +8.3% burst, making October the tastiest performing month since late 2010. This came in stark contrast to the indigestion experienced with the -8.7% decline over the previous two months.

What’s behind all these sweet gains? For starters, fears of a Chinese economic sugar-high ending in a crash have abated for now. With that said, “Little Red Riding Hood” is not out of the woods quite yet. Like a surprising goblin or ghost popping out to scare you at a Halloween haunted house, China could still rear its ugly head in the future due to its prominent stature as the second largest global economy. We have been forced to deal with similar on-again-off-again concerns associated with Greece.

The good news is the Chinese government and central bank are not sitting on their hands. In addition to interest rate cuts and corruption crackdowns, Chinese government officials have even recently halted its decades-long one-child policy. China’s new two-child policy is designed to spur flagging economic growth and also reverse the country’s aging demographic profile.

Also contributing to the stock market’s sugary October advances is an increasing comfort level with the Federal Reserve’s eventual interest rate increase. Just last week, the central bank released the statement from its October Federal Open Market Committee meetings stating it will determine whether it will be “appropriate” to increase interest rates at its next meetings, which take place on December 15th and 16th. Interest rate financial markets are now baking in a roughly 50% probability of a Fed interest rate hike next month. Initially, the October Fed statement was perceived negatively by investors due to fears that higher rates could potentially choke off economic growth. Within a 30 minute period after the announcement, stock prices reversed course and surged higher. Investors interpreted the Fed signal of a possible interest rate hike as an upbeat display of confidence in a strengthening economy.

As I have reiterated on numerous occasions (see also Fed Fatigue), a +0.25% increase in the Federal Funds rate from essentially a level of 0% is almost irrelevant in my eyes – just like adjusting the Jacuzzi temperature from 102 degrees down to 101 degrees is hardly noticeable. More practically speaking, an increase from 14.00% to 14.25% on a credit card interest rate will not deter consumers from spending, just like a 3.90% mortgage rising to 4.15% will not break the bank for homebuyers. On the other hand, if interest rates were to spike materially higher by 3.00% – 4.00% over a very short period of time, this move would have a much more disruptive impact, and would be cause for concern. Fortunately for equity investors, this scenario is rather unlikely in the short-run due to virtually no sign of inflation at either the consumer or worker level. Actually, if you read the Fed’s most recent statement, Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen indicated the central bank intends to maintain interest rates below “normal” levels for “some time” even if the economy keeps chugging along at a healthy clip.

If you think my interest rate perspective is the equivalent of me whistling past the graveyard, history proves to be a pretty good guide of what normally happens after the Fed increases interest rates. Bolstering my argument is data observed over the last seven Federal Reserve interest rate hike cycles from 1983 – 2006 (see table below). As the statistics show, stock prices increased an impressive +20.9% on average over Fed interest rate “Tightening Cycles.” It is entirely conceivable that the announcement of a December interest rate hike could increase short-term volatility. We saw this rate hike fear phenomenon a few months ago, and also a few years ago in 2013 (see also Will Rising Rates Murder Market?) when Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke threatened an end to quantitative easing (a.k.a., “Taper Tantrum”), but eventually people figured out the world was not going to end and stock prices ultimately moved higher.

fed cycles

Besides increased comfort with Fed interest rate policies, another positive contributing factor to the financial market rebound was the latest Congressional approval of a two-year budget deal that prevents the government from defaulting on its debt. Not only does the deal suspend the $18.1 trillion debt limit through March 2017 (see chart below), but the legislation also lowers the chance of a government shutdown in December. Rather than creating a contentious battle for the fresh, incoming Speaker of the House (Paul Ryan), the approved budget deal will allow the new Speaker to start with a clean slate with which he can use to negotiate across a spectrum of political issues.

debt limit

Source: Wall Street Journal

Remain Calm – Not Frightened

Humans, including all investors, are emotional beings, but the best investors separate fear from greed and are masters at making unemotional, objective decisions. Just as everything wasn’t a scary disaster when stocks declined during August and September, so too, the subsequent rise in October doesn’t mean everything is a bed of roses.

Every three months, thousands of companies share their financial report cards with investors, and so far with more than 65% of the S&P 500 companies reporting their results this period, corporate America is not making the honor roll. Collapsing commodity prices, including oil, along with the rapid appreciation in the value of the U.S. dollar (i.e., causing declines in relatively expensive U.S. exports), third quarter profit growth has declined -1%. If you exclude the energy sector from the equation, corporations are still not making the “Dean’s List,” however the report cards look a lot more respectable through this lens with profits rising +6% during the third quarter. A sluggish third quarter GDP (Gross Domestic Product) growth report of +1.5% is further evidence the economy has plenty of room to improve the country’s financial GPA.

Historically speaking, October has been a scary period, if you consider the 1929 and 1987 stock market crashes occurred during this Halloween month. Now that investors have survived this frightening period, we will see if the “Santa Claus Rally” will arrive early this season. Stock market treats have been sweet in recent weeks, but investors cannot lose sight of the long-term. With interest rates near generational lows, investors need to make sure they are efficiently investing their investment funds in a low-cost, tax-efficient, diversified manner, subject to personal time horizons and risk tolerances. Over the long-run, meeting these objectives will create a lot more treats than tricks.

investment-questions-border

www.Sidoxia.com

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®

Plan. Invest. Prosper. 

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients hold positions in certain exchange traded funds (ETFs) , but at the time of publishing, SCM had no direct position in any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC Contact page.

November 2, 2015 at 12:18 pm Leave a comment

Sidoxia Adds 25-Year Veteran to Team

an aerial view of a rowing crew in action.

NEWPORT BEACH, CA – (Wire-Business) – Keith C. Bong, CFA, CPA, has recently joined Sidoxia Capital Management, LLC (“Sidoxia”) as Vice President of Investments and Financial Planning. Keith brings over 25 years of experience to Sidoxia’s investment team, having worked as a Financial Consultant with Merrill Lynch, before founding the investment firm Topper Capital Management in Irvine, California.  

Keith’s dedication to the financial planning field and his clients is evidenced by his impeccable credentials. In addition to achieving the esteemed CFA charterholder and CPA designations, Keith attained a Masters of Business Administration degree from Columbia University with a concentration in finance and accounting. Keith also earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from UCLA with a double major in economics and political science.

Keith 5 (1 of 1)

“We are truly excited to bring such a high caliber individual like Keith on board,” stated Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®, President and Founder of Sidoxia Capital Management. “We’re confident that Keith’s unique experience and knowledge will bring tremendous value to Sidoxia’s clients as our firm continues to expand.”   

For over a decade, while managing his former advisory firm, Keith has worked closely with business owners, corporations, and individuals, assisting these clients with critical investment planning, tax planning, and financial planning goals.

“I believe my experience in building corporate retirement plan solutions meshes well with Sidoxia’s successful investment platform,” noted Keith. “I’m thrilled to join an independent firm like Sidoxia that places clients’ needs first, unlike some other financial institutions.”  

To learn more about Sidoxia and Keith Bong’s background, please visit http://www.Sidoxia.com and reference the “Investment Team” section.

Click here to download a copy of the press release.   

Plan. Invest. Prosper.

DISCLOSURE: No information provided here constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC Contact page.

March 3, 2014 at 10:59 am Leave a comment

2011 Sidoxia – IC Greatest Hits

There was some entertaining dancing going on early in 2011, but for the most part, the year brought a lot of rock ‘n’ roll on its way to what looks like a flattish year on a return basis.  Sidoxia Capital Management and Investing Caffeine (IC) followed everything from the Royal Wedding and Charlie Sheen to the debt ceiling debate and the Arab Spring. Amongst all the celebration and chaos, IC pounded away at the keyboard and reported on the financial markets and the virtues of investing. Out of the 80 or so postings at IC this year, here are my top 11 favorites of 2011:

•  Spoonfuls of Investment Knowledge: Classic investment quotes and tenets.

•  10 Ways to Destroy Your Portfolio: Investment mistakes to avoid.

•  Solving Europe and Your Deadbeat Cousin: Putting the European financial crisis in context.

•  A Serious Situation in Jackson Hole:  The “Situation” meets Ben Bernanke.

•  It’s the Earnings, Stupid: Stock prices and the inextricable ties with earnings.

•  Innovative Bird Keeps All the Worms:  Innovative not first mover gains the prize.

•  Snoozing Your Way to Investment Prosperity: How to invest and sleep well during financial market mayhem.

•  The Fallacy of High P/E’s: Sustainably high earnings growth can trump high P/E ratios.

•  Gospel from 20th Century Investment King: Investment maxims from legend Sir John Templeton.

•  The 10 Investment Commandments: Charles Ellis passes down key laws to investment disciples.

•  Share Buybacks and Bathroom Violators: Pet peeves in the bathroom and share repurchase.

Happy Holidays and Happy New Year from Investing Caffeine and Sidoxia Capital Management!

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®

Plan. Invest. Prosper.

www.Sidoxia.com

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients own certain exchange traded funds, but at the time of publishing SCM had no direct position in any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC “Contact” page.

December 24, 2011 at 8:56 pm Leave a comment

Buried Alive

Source: Photobucket

Unfortunately, I am temporarily buried with quarterly investment client duties, not to mention preparation for the avalanche of pending quarterly corporate earnings.  If I don’t return in the coming days, send out the rescue troops. In the mean time, if you interested in more of my blabbing, check out a recent radio interview I completed. After clicking on the link, just scroll down to the WHME- FM play button icon:

Click Here for Interview of Wade Slome (Investing Caffeine Editor)

 

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®  

Plan. Invest. Prosper.  

www.Sidoxia.com

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients own certain exchange traded funds, but at the time of publishing SCM had no direct position in any security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC “Contact” page.

October 18, 2010 at 1:42 am Leave a comment

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