Posts tagged ‘Oscars’

Sidoxia Debuts Video & Goes to the Movies

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Article is an excerpt from previously released Sidoxia Capital Management’s complementary February 1, 2013 newsletter. Subscribe on right side of page.

The red carpet was rolled out for the stock market in January with the Dow Jones Industrial Average rising +5.8% and the S&P 500 index up an equally impressive +5.0% (a little higher rate than the 0.0001% being earned in bank accounts). Movie stars are also strutting their stuff down the red carpet this time of the year as they collect shiny statues at ritzy award shows like the Golden Globes and Oscars. Given the vast volumes of honors bestowed, we thought what better time to put on our tuxes and create our own 2013 nominations for the economy and financial markets. If you are unhappy with our selections, you are welcome to cast your own votes in the comments section below.

By award category, here are Sidoxia’s 2013 selections: 

Best Drama (Government Shutdown & Debt Ceiling): Washington D.C. has provided no shortage of drama, and the upcoming blockbusters of Shutdown & Debt Ceiling are worthy of its Best Drama nomination. If Congressional Democrats and Republicans don’t vote in favor of a new “Continuing Resolution” by March 27th, then our United States government will come to a grinding halt. At issue is Republican’s desire for additional government spending cuts to lower our deficit, which is likely to exceed $1 trillion for the fifth consecutive year. If you like more heart pumping drama, the Senate has just passed a Debt Ceiling extension through May 18th…mark those calendars! 

Best Horror Film (Sequestration): Most people have already seen the scary prequel, The Fiscal Cliff, but the sequel Sequestration deserves the horror film honors of 2013. This upcoming blood-filled movie about broad, automatic, across-the-board government cost cuts will make any casual movie-watcher scream in terror. The $1.2 trillion in spending cuts (over 10 years) are so gory, many viewers may voluntarily leave the theater early. If you are waiting for the release, Sequestration is coming to a theater near you on March 1st, unless Congress, in an unlikely scenario, cancels the launch.

Best Director (Ben Bernanke): Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke’s film, entitled, The U.S. Economy, had a massive budget of about $16 trillion dollars, based on estimates of last year’s GDP (Gross Domestic Product). Nevertheless, Bernanke managed to do whatever it took (including trillions of dollars in bond buying) to prevent the economic movie studio from collapsing into bankruptcy. While many movie-goers were critical of his directorial debut, inflation has remained subdued thus far, and he has promised to continue his stimulative monetary policies (i.e., keep interest rates low) until the national unemployment rate falls below 6.5% or inflation rises above 2.5%. 

Best Foreign Film (China): Americans are not the only people who produce movies globally. A certain country with a population of nearly 1.4 billion people also makes movies too…China. In the most recently completed 4th quarter, China’s economy experienced blockbuster growth in the form of +7.9% GDP expansion. This was the fastest pace achieved by China in two whole years. To put this metric into perspective, compare China’s heroic growth to the bomb created by the U.S. economy, which registered a disappointing -0.1% contraction at the economic box office. China’s popularity should bring in business all around the globe.  

Best Special Effects (Japan): After coming out with a series of continuous flops, Japan recently launched some fresh new special effects in the form of a $116 billion emergency stimulus package. The country also has plans to superficially enhance the visual portrayal of its economy by implementing its own faux money-printing program modeled after our country’s quantitative easing actions (i.e., the Federal Reserve stimulus). As a result of these initiatives, the Japanese Nikkei index – their equivalent of our Dow Jones Industrial index – has risen by +29% in less than 3 months to a level of 11,138.66 (click here for chart). But don’t get too excited. This same Nikkei index peaked at 38,957 in 1989, a far cry from its current level. 

Best Action Film (Icahn vs. Ackman): This surprisingly entertaining action film features a senile 76-year-old corporate raider and a white-haired, 46-year-old Harvard grad. The investment foes I am referring to are the elder Carl Icahn, Chairman of Icahn Enterprises, and junior Bill Ackman, CEO of Pershing Square Capital Management. In addition to terms such as crybaby, loser, and liar, the 27-minute verbal spat (view more here) between Icahn (his net worth equal to about $15 billion) and Ackman (net worth approaching $1 billion) includes some NC-17 profanity. The clash of these investment titans stems from a decade-old lawsuit, in addition to a recent disagreement over a controversial short position in Herbalife Ltd. (HLF), a nutritional multi-level marketing firm. 

Best Documentary (Europe): As with a lot of reality-based films, many don’t receive a lot of attention. So too has been the commentary regarding the eurozone, which has been relatively peaceful compared to last spring. Despite the comparative media silence, European unemployment reached a new high of 11.8% late last year. This European documentary is not one you should ignore. European Central Bank (ECB) President Mario Draghi just stated, “The risks surrounding the outlook for the euro area remain on the downside.”  

Best Original Song (National Anthem): We won’t read anything politically into Beyonce’s lip-synced rendition of The Star-Spangled Banner at the presidential inauguration, but she is still worthy of the Sidoxia nomination because music we hear in the movies is also recorded. I’m certain her rapping husband Jay-Z agrees whole-heartedly with this viewpoint.

Best Motion Picture (Sidoxia Video): It may only be three minutes long, but as my grandmother told me, “Great things come in small packages.” I may be a little biased, but judge for yourself by watching Sidoxia’s Oscar-worthy motion picture debut:

 

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®

Plan. Invest. Prosper.

www.Sidoxia.com

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients hold positions in certain exchange traded funds (ETFs), but at the time of publishing SCM had no direct position in HLF, Japanese ETFs,  or any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC Contact page.

February 2, 2013 at 1:10 am Leave a comment

Reality More Fascinating than Fiction

Make-believe is fun, but reality is often more fascinating than fiction. The same can be said for the books I read. Actually, all the books reviewed at Investing Caffeine have been non-fiction. My movie-viewing preferences happen to be quite similar – comedies and dramas are terrific, but I’m also a documentary fanatic. As a matter of fact, I have rented or watched more than 125 documentaries (and mockumentary, This is Spinal Tap) over the last six years.

There have been a slew of non-fiction books written about the recent global financial crisis, including the ones I reviewed: Too Big to Fail, The Greatest Trade Ever, and The Big Short. When it comes to videos, I have seen several TV-based documentaries covering various aspects of the global meltdown, but the Inside Job did an exceptionally good job of providing a global perspective of the financial collapse. The film was produced, written, and directed by Charles Ferguson (you can call him “doctor” thanks to the Ph.D he earned at MIT) and also narrated by Academy Award winner Matt Damon. The Inside Job provided a comprehensive worldly view by filming on location in the United States, Iceland, England, France, Singapore, and China. Not only did Ferguson break down the complex facets of the crisis into easily digestible pieces for the audience, but he also features prominent journalists, politicians, and academics who describe the complicated global events from a birds-eye view. Hedge fund manager George Soros,  former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer, and economist Nouriel Roubini, are a small subset of the heavy-hitters interviewed in the movie.

A wide range of causes and effects were explored – everything from derivatives, lack of regulation, excessive banker compensation, and the pervasive conflicts of interest throughout the financial system. Bankers and politicians shoulder much of the blame for the global crisis, and Ferguson does not go out of his way to present their side of the story.  Ferguson does a fairly decent job of keeping his direct personal political views out of the film, but based on his undergraduate Berkeley degree and his non-stop Goldman Sachs (GS) bashing, I think someone could profitably prevail in wagering on which side of the political fence Ferguson resides.

Although I give Inside Job a “thumbs-up,” I wasn’t the only person who liked the movie. The Inside Job in fact won numerous awards, including the 2010 Academy Award for Best Documentary, Best Documentary from the New York Film Critics Circle, and the Best Documentary Screenplay from the Writers Guild.

Slome’s Oscar Nominees

As I mentioned previously, I am somewhat fanatical when it comes to documentaries, although I have yet to see Justin Bieber’s Never Say Never. Besides the Inside Job, here is a varied list of must-see documentaries. There may be a conflict of personal tastes on a few of these, but I will provide you a hand-written apology for anybody that falls asleep to more than one of my top 15:

1)      Murderball

2)      A Crude Awakening  

3)      Touching the Void

4)      It Might Get Loud

5)      Hoop Dreams

6)      Lewis and Clark: The Journey (Ken Burns)

7)       The Staircase

8)      Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room

9)      Cracking the Code of Life  

10)   Paradise Lost

11)   The Endurance

12)   Devil’s Playground  

13)   Everest: Beyond the Limit

14)   The Devil Came on Horseback

15)   Emmanuel’s Gift

I’m obviously biased about the quality of my recommended documentaries, but you can even the score by sharing some of your favorite documentaries in the comment section below or by emailing me directly. I will be greatly indebted for any suggestions offered. Regardless, whether watching a truth-revealing thought-piece like the Inside Job or A Crude awakening, or an inspirational story like Murderball or Touching the Void, I’m convinced that these reality based stories are much more fascinating than the vast majority of recycled fiction continually shoveled out by Hollywood. For those adventurous movie-watchers, check out a documentary or two – who knows…there may be an inner-documentary fanatic in you too?

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP® 

Plan. Invest. Prosper. 

www.Sidoxia.com

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients own certain exchange traded funds, but at the time of publishing SCM had no direct position in GS, or any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC “Contact” page.

April 4, 2011 at 11:10 pm 3 comments


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