Posts tagged ‘Morgan Stanley’

Sigmund Freud the Portfolio Manager

Source: Syracuse.com

Byron Wien, former investment strategist at Morgan Stanley (MS) and current Vice Chairman at Blackstone Advisory Partners (BX), traveled to Austria 25 years ago and used Sigmund Freud’s success in psychoanalytical theory development as a framework to apply it to the investment management field.

This is how Wien describes Freud’s triumphs in the field of psychology:

“He accomplished much because he successfully anticipated the next step in his developing theories, and he did that by analyzing everything that had gone before carefully. This is the antithesis of the way portfolio managers approach their work.”

 

Wien attempts to reconcile the historical shortcomings of investment managers by airing out his dirty mistakes for others to view.

“I think most of us have developed patterns of mistake-making, which, if analyzed carefully, would lead to better performance in the future…In an effort to encourage investment professionals to determine their error patterns, I have gathered the data and analyzed my own follies, and I have decided to let at least some of my weaknesses hang out. Perhaps this will inspire you to collect the information on your own decisions over the past several years to see if there aren’t some errors that you could make less frequently in the future.”

 

Here are the recurring investment mistakes Wien shares in his analysis:

Selling Too Early: Wien argues that “profit-taking” alone is not reason enough to sell. Precious performance points can be lost, especially if trading activity is done for the sole purpose of looking busy.

The Turnaround with the Heart of Gold: Sympathy for laggard groups and stocks is inherent in the contrarian bone that most humans use to root for the underdog. Wien highlights the typical underestimation investors attribute to turnaround situations – reality is usually a much more difficult path than hoped.

Overstaying a Winner: Round-trip stocks – those positions that go for long price appreciation trips but return over time to the same stock price of the initial purchase – were common occurrences for Mr. Wien in the past. Wien blames complacency, neglect, and infatuation with new stock ideas for these overextended stays.

Underestimating the Seriousness of a Problem: More often than not, the first bad quarter is rarely the last. Investors are quick to recall the rare instance of the quick snapback, even if odds would dictate there are more cockroaches lurking after an initial sighting. As Wien says, “If you’re going to stay around for things to really improve, you’d better have plenty of other good stocks and very tolerant clients.”

It may have been 1986 when Byron Wien related the shortcomings in investing with Sigmund Freud’s process of psychoanalysis, but the analysis of common age-old mistakes made back then are just as relevant today, whether looking at a brain or a stock.

See also: Killing Patients to Prosperity

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP® 

Plan. Invest. Prosper. 

www.Sidoxia.com

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients own certain exchange traded funds, but at the time of publishing SCM had no direct position in MS, BX, or any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC “Contact” page.

April 25, 2011 at 10:15 am Leave a comment

The Internet: The Fourth Necessity

The basic necessities for human life are food, water, shelter and most importantly…the internet. Imagine a world where you cannot: access your email; text your spouse or significant other in the same house; Twitter the contents of your lunch; or Facebook a YouTube video of a dancing meringue dog (see video).  Scary thought.

Many people take the internet for granted, just like the air we breathe, but how important a role does the internet play in people’s lives? Mary Meeker, internet analyst from Morgan Stanley, takes a look at this question in a recently released presentation she completed. Earlier in the decade, Meeker was raked over the coals during the deflation of the internet bubble, but in many respects she has been redeemed in the subsequent years as hundreds of millions of people continue to plug into the internet.

According to the broad base of expert strategists, we apparently are living in an overvalued, “New Normal ” market with subdued growth for as far as the eye can see (check out New Abnormal). In the mean time Meeker shows how the top 15 global internet franchises have nearly quadrupled revenue from $33 billion in 2004 to $126 billion today. Perhaps abnormally outsized opportunities in the corporate internet universe will be the “New Normal” over the coming years?

Internet Ubiquity

Source: Morgan Stanley

How ubiquitous is the internet becoming? Last year 1.8 billion people accessed this invisible global flattening medium we like to call the internet, and users spent 18.8 trillion minutes online, up +21% over the previous year. Many people are very familiar with the home-bred internet franchises of Facebook (620 million users), Google (940 million users), and Apple (120 million internet device users), but many investors under-appreciate the global scale of international internet franchises like Tencent (637 million users…more than Facebook by the way), Baidu ($40 billion market value), or Alibaba.com ($10 billion market value).

Source: Morgan Stanley

Mobile ubiquity is on the rise too. Connecting through a desktop or laptop is not enough these days, so internet addicts are increasingly attaching a mobile phone umbilical cord for such useful bathroom applications such as this (click here). Lugging a laptop around all over the place can be an inconvenience. So primal is the mobile instinct among internet users, Morgan Stanley expects mobile phone shipments to surpass PC and laptop shipments over the next 24 months.

What’s Next?

The party is just getting started. If you just consider eCommerce (purchases online), which only accounts for 4% of total commerce conducted in the U.S., then there is a lot of headroom for internet purchases to expand. The incredible potential rings true especially if you contemplate old traditional catalog, which peaked at more than 10% of overall commerce according to some industry executives. The rich feature functionality afforded to users through the internet, coupled with the increased convenience of mobility, augur well for future ecommerce sales growth.

The internet has been around for 15 years, but in the whole scheme of things this transformative medium is just a baby – especially if you consider the amount of time it took other revolutions like electricity, the rail network, and automobile proliferation to spread.  That is why it is not too late to join the internet party.  Food, water, and shelter are human necessities of life, just like exposure to the internet revolution is a necessity for your investment portfolio.

Read the Morgan Stanley Internet Presentation by Mary Meeker

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP® 

Plan. Invest. Prosper. 

http://www.Sidoxia.com

DISCLOSURE: Sidoxia Capital Management (SCM) and some of its clients own certain exchange traded funds, AAPL and GOOG, but at the time of publishing SCM had no direct position in MS, BIDU, Tencent, Alibaba.com, Facebook, Twitter, or any other security referenced in this article. No information accessed through the Investing Caffeine (IC) website constitutes investment, financial, legal, tax or other advice nor is to be relied on in making an investment or other decision. Please read disclosure language on IC “Contact” page.

November 19, 2010 at 1:32 am Leave a comment

Measuring Chaos

Ruler

An interesting study was done by Morgan Stanley Europe, in which they looked at the last 19 bear markets and subsequent rallies. I’m not sure how much weight you can put on these results since every bear market is unique in its own right, nonetheless it provides a good frame of reference for debates.

What the Morgan Stanley team found was that the median bear market resulted in a -57% decline over 30 months and the ensuing rally equaled about +71% over 17 months. The problem is that our bear market in the U.S. was much shorter than the median timeframe despite its steepness – the fall effectively began in October 2007 and bottomed in March 2009 (about 17 months in duration). Since the decline was faster in duration, does that mean the advance will be as well? Not sure. Our current rally has lasted about six months, which implies there is about another year for the rally to continue based on this data.  

Prieur du Plessis wrote about the Morgan Stanley work for Seeking Alpha

Prieur du Plessis wrote about the Morgan Stanley work for Seeking Alpha

As I alluded to earlier, it’s hard to compare an average to a period in which we had financial institutions dropping like flies (i.e., Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers, WaMu, Fannie Mae, AIG, etc.) and people were hiding in caves – you knew it was really serious when it even caused voracious consumers to save money…imagine that. At the end of the day, stock and index prices eventually follow earnings. Because of the severity of this downfall, earnings came down faster than prices because fundamentals deteriorated faster than cost cutting could take place. When the economy begins to recover, the opposite will occur – businesses will not be able to hire and spend as fast as earnings are growing. It will be a nice problem to have, but nonetheless characteristic of a typical economic recovery.

Cycle II

In the U.S., the consumer will have a lot to say about the shape of the recovery since they account for about 2/3 of our country’s economic activity. The other “X” factor will be to what extent government legislation will have an impact on the economy. There will be opportunities available domestically and internally, but in order to survive the chaos, one needs to have a diversified and balanced global approach.

Read the Full Seeking Alpha Article Here

Wade W. Slome, CFA, CFP®

Plan. Invest. Prosper.

September 3, 2009 at 4:00 am Leave a comment


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